Musing #58: Mutual Fund (SIP) Portfolio Overlap Analyser



Being from a finance background, I made it a point to invest in SIPs early on. Over the years, while the investment amount has increased steadily, the number of funds being invested in has remained more or less constant. Hence, I need not emphasis how important it is to know where exactly the money is going.

Too often, the choice of a fund is made simply on returns and diversification is achieved by selecting a different fund class. However, it provides no indication of the extent of value creation. I prefer to keep an eye out on what's happening with my portfolio and it is not only when selecting a new fund but also for keeping tabs on what's going on with the existing investments.


My search for websites/files providing this information yielded a few options that were quite limited in nature, dispensing basic overlap information between two or three funds. Unable to find the requisite information, I decided to go on my own and create an Excel workbook that provides overlap analysis for up to six funds. The other target I had set for myself was to do so without the use of VBA, so the only permission required is to access the external data source - moneycontrol.com.

The workbook is structured in to distinct sheets for input and detailed analysis. The 'Input' sheet is pretty straightforward and is essentially a two-step process requiring the funds and investment amount to be entered along with the selection of the fund that would form the basis of checking the overlap. It would be a good idea to read through the notes prior to using the workbook. The sheet has some safeguards built in to alert the user about inconsistent inputs, like missing investment values/funds and failure to refresh the 'base fund' selection. At the same time, it is robust enough to still function immaculately when any of the selected funds are deleted.


Note that although the sheet includes funds with equity holdings from various classes, some of them do not have their holdings listed on moneycontrol.com which may cause an error illustrated above. As such, there is nothing that can be done about it. Also, to state the obvious, the default funds selected in the sheet are for illustration and are not suggestive.


The 'Analysis' sheet provides the primary analysis of the portfolio. Besides listing the fund class and the equity holdings of each fund, it provides the percentage overlap of the base fund with all the other funds in the portfolio, both, in terms of the number of stocks and the value invested. The charts in turn provide 'Top 10' visualisations for individual stocks as well as the different sectors.


The 'Detail' sheet provides the tabular information that form the basis of the analysis and lists all the values as against only the Top 10 in the charts.


The 'MFx' sheets list the holdings of each fund, as retrieved from moneycontrol.com and is subsequently used for the overlap calculations.


Finally, the 'List' sheet is a list of the funds retrieved from moneycontrol.com and covers the various equity fund classes. It is easy to add any new funds to the list in the specified format and the information can be scraped en masse from the MoneyControl site.

As is often the case, I have created something to primarily fulfil my needs but with the intention of sharing it with other netizens. Consequently, I am open to any suggestions for improvement which you may leave in the comments section.

Link: Download from Google Drive

Musing #56: My First Smartwatch Face (McWatchFace)


The watch face has registered an average of 100 downloads a day since it was published, despite the fact that I have not publicised it anywhere else. It is simply through discovery on the Galaxy App Store and I am humbled by its popularity.

A smart life deserves a smartwatch, or perhaps it is smarter to be without one. Setting wisdom aside, I purchased my first one earlier this week - Samsung Gear Fit2 Pro. By being 1/3rd as expensive as a WiFi-only Series 3 Apple Watch, it won my wallet, if not my heart. I will reserve judgement on the device for the review, which isn't likely to materialise until I have used it extensively.

This post, then, is about a watch face, to be precise, my first creation of it. Kudos to Samsung for making available an easy-to-use designer, utilising which I was able to create the watch face in hours and survive the royal wedding. Having not found what I was looking for, I decided to create one for myself. The focus in this case was on information density and making the most of the colours on the AMOLED display without straining the battery life excessively.


The result is a crowded watch face that includes all the details that I could wish for. Besides the inclusion of all the fitness information, the icons for weather, music, settings, calendar, step count, floors and heart rate are all tapable with the date redirecting to the 'Today' view.


I was also inclined to keep the display "always-on" and hence chose a minimalist approach for this scenario. It fulfils the purpose of telling time while making it possible to keep an eye on the ever-draining battery. As per the analysis available within the designer, the current on pixel ratio is 1.5% with the minimum being below 1%.

I will mostly publish this watch face in the Samsung Galaxy App Store in the coming week, so be on the lookout for that. On the other hand, if you have some suggestions for future watch faces, then don't hesitate to leave a comment.

(Originally published on May 19, 2018)

Update #1 (May 20, 2018): The higher than expected battery drain in the "always on" mode over the past few hours made me investigate the possibilities of reducing the power consumption while still retaining this mode. A little bit of digging brought up this article which indicates that the next best thing to black is green. Effecting this change for the "always on" mode produces the following result:


The maximum 'Current on Pixel Ratio' is now 1/3rd (there's that ratio again!) of the original one. In fact due to the usage of green, this ratio now remains more or less constant and drops to 0.4% on certain occasions. Finally, I am not open to compromising the "Active" mode too much for power saving, but I have demoted the white to "seconds" which should help a bit.


Update #2 (May 22, 2018): A few more tweaks and optimisations went in to the watch face over the past couple of days and I assume that it can't get any denser than this. With the audience of one being satisfied, I have submitted the watch face to the 'Samsung Galaxy Apps' store and hope that it makes its way through to countless others. For now, I shall leave you with a cover image.

Update #3 (May 24, 2018): The watch face has been approved and is now available on the Samsung Galaxy App store. As an homage to Boaty McBoatface, I have named it as McWatchFace, so you know how to find it.

Update #4 (June 2, 2018): v1.0.2 was published earlier this week and it introduced the option of choosing the 'Distance Unit' besides squashing some bugs. I had started off with the intent of having a single watch face but a bug in Gear Watch Designer prevented me from implementing the 12/24H toggle. Moreover, since the toggle is dependent on the phone, it might be a good idea to have separate watch faces. I might revisit this idea later but for now I suppose I could move towards experimenting with the other features available in GWD.

Update #5 (June 10, 2018): v1.0.3 ushers in animation, starting with the weather icon. I have also published a YouTube video depicting the features of the watch face, as of this version.


Yours truly has also presented own self with a 'signature edition', remarkably named 'MyWatchFace'. Unfortunately, there is no means for user customisation, so this one remains in my sole possession.


Update #6 (June 12, 2018): Samsung seems to have a really inconsistent policy. While v1.0.3 of the 12-Hour version was published without any issues, the similar 24-hour variant was rejected for not supporting Chinese and Arabic.

It would  make sense if the issue was replicable but the emulator as well as my Gear Fit2 Pro show the date just fine in all languages including Chinese and Arabic. It should be mentioned that the language on the Gear Fit2 Pro mirrors that of the phone, so testing the languages implies changing the  primary language of the phone which gets ridiculous real fast.

So, to take the ridiculousness up a notch, I have submitted the same file once again as one can't resolve an issue that doesn't exist. May be I will catch a break and the watch face will pass through as-is or otherwise some minor tweak might be in order.

Update #7 (June 14, 2018): Unsurprisingly, the watch face was published as submitted and with that I have decided to bring the development of this watch face to an end. Hopefully, I will have time further down the line to create other unique watch faces, in which case they should eventually end up at the Galaxy App Store.

Review #53: Samsung Gear Fit2 Pro (with iOS) ★★★★☆

00 - Prologue

It is best to clarify at the beginning where this review is coming from. Although I have used a Fitbit One for 3 years, I have never been a fitness freak. It has only been about hitting personal targets of activity every day and hence I value consistency more than accuracy. At the same time, I was on the lookout for a smartwatch that had HR and iOS notification support. All of this had to be accommodated within a strict budget which led me to the Samsung Gear Fit2 Pro, but the question remains - should I have got it?

Musing #57: Steam Link on Fire TV


The release (or lack of it) of the Steam Link app caused a lot of brouhaha in the past month. While it it is meant for mobile devices, it undeniably adds a lot of value to the Fire TV and for that matter to all Android devices. It is a must-have that would have certainly made it to my list of  'The Essentials' were it available back then. It is not officially available on Amazon, so your best bet is to sideload it.

As I mentioned previously in my review of the AFTV3, the Ethernet adapter doesn't make a whole lot of sense as it is limited to 100 Mbps. However, it would be more than enough in this case as Steam Link requires a maximum of 30 Mbps for streaming. Unfortunately, I had to rely on the 5 GHz WiFi network (Steam Link doesn't support 2.4 GHz) with the TV being 25 metres away from the router, separated by a wall. This issue is compounded by the fact the 5 GHz receiver on the AFTV3 is exceptionally weak.

After playing with the settings, the only way I could get Steam Link working on the AFTV3 over such a long distance was by switching the 5 GHz channel bandwidth to 20 MHz. This significantly reduces the throughput but is a necessity for my current setup which I hope to change soon. Over the 20 MHz channel and at a distance of 25 metres, Steam Link works unimpeded in the 'Balanced' mode which uses 15 Mbps. I was even able to get the 'Beautiful' mode, requiring 30 Mbps, to work over the 20 MHz channel but it was inconsistent. On the other hand, it worked exceptionally well over the 40 MHz channel as can be seen below, but the AFTV3 was unable to sustain the signal over the distance, resulting in frequent disconnections. Nonetheless, this is an issue that can be easily resolved through some rearrangement.


Steam makes it quite evident that the software is in beta and that AFTV is not officially tested.


 However, as long as the network is up to it, the AFTV is more than capable of streaming.


Inability of the network to stream properly is indicated with the frame loss and network variance.


Setting up Steam Link is extremely easy as it essentially requires pairing the TV with the host PC using a PIN.


Additionally, the Steam Client on PC requested the installation of additional audio drivers once the setup was done, but I presume this might depend on the setup. I had sold my Xiaomi Bluetooth controller a few months back so I didn't have a controller to pair with Steam. However, I did have my Apple Wireless Keyboard and Logitech M557 paired to AFTV which ought to have done the job. 


While the keyboard worked fine with the Big Picture mode, v1.1.3 of Steam Link that I installed initially didn't support the mouse which was subsequently rectified in v1.1.4, indicating that Valve is actively paying attention to user feedback. At present, the lag isn't too bad, but the mouse controls are too sensitive which I presume is due to the fact that the tuning has been done as per analog controllers. It might make sense to pick up the Xbox One S or Steam controller for universal compatibility.

With the initial impression being quite good, one can only hope for Steam Link to work seamlessly once it comes out of beta. Perhaps the Steam Sale will become a lot more attractive for AFTV owners.

Sundry #12: AI Ads


I have decided to cede further control to the machine overloads so that when the time comes, they shall know I did the right thing. You too shall have no recourse than to blame the machines for the abhorrent ads while I go "ka-ching". However, I have ensured that the human touch remains by retaining the ad under the "Advertisement (Or Not!)" section. Rest all is the machine's doing.

Coincidentally, it is two years since I first enabled ads on the site. I have no idea why I should be musing over ads, so this time it has been filed under Sundry. Ironically, I have Pi-hole as well as uBlock Origin enabled as I write this, so the placement of ads is a mystery to me. However, I managed to catch a glimpse from the mobile app and it seems that the ad placement is limited to the header and side bar rather than the content which is perfectly fine.

However, if you feel aggrieved, just give me a shout and I shall set the machines on to you.