Review #53: Samsung Gear Fit2 Pro (with iOS) ★★★⯪☆

Update #4 (Oct 31, 2018):  I have come to realise that my previous optimism was unwarranted. iOS 12, as a matter of fact, still doesn't support the GF2 Pro.

My previous GF2 Pro detection on 12.0.1 came about on account of the device being already paired on iOS 11 prior to the update. However, unpairing the device caused it to no longer be detected on 12.0.1. Worst still, nothing has changed after the update to iOS 12.1.

Since iOS 11.4.1 is no longer signed by Apple, this means that my GF2 Pro is left to operate as a standalone device till the time either companies decide to do something about it, which going by the recent turn of events, might be never.

Edit: Turns out that it may be more of a Samsung software issue more than anything else. A full reset is usually a last resort and even when that didn't result in the device being detected, it seemed all was lost. However, resetting the Gear Fit2 Pro while also reinstalling the Gear Fit app did the trick as the new device setup finally popped up on the app, following which it is working as usual.

The issue seems to be a mixture of buggy Samsung software and the manner in which iOS operates. As always, it for the consumer to bear the brunt of this unholy alliance.

Update #3 (Oct 8, 2018): I paid more attention to the iOS 12.0.1 change log than I normally do for any iOS release and there was one entry that particularly caught my eye:
  • Addresses an issue where Bluetooth could become unavailable
As a result, I initiated the update from 11.4.1 with more than just hope and sure enough, my belief was rewarded. Incidentally, I had filed a bug report with Apple and would like to believe that it played a part as well, though that's unlikely. Anyway, all's well that ends well and in this regard the frequent update schedule for iOS is certainly beneficial.

Update #2 (Sep 21, 2018): The GF2 Pro isn't detected on the iOS 12.1 beta either. However, it works normally after downgrading to 11.4.1. Surprisingly, it seems that the original GF2 has no compatibility issues with iOS 12 which makes this situation even more curious. Samsung hasn't yet responded to any of my communications through the App Store, Twitter and e-mail, so one can only hope that a fix is in the works.

Update #1 (Sep 13, 2018): With a new iPhone launch comes a new OS. While iOS 12 is a welcome relief for iOS 11 users, it spells danger for Gear Fit2 Pro owners.

I updated to the iOS 12 GM release (16A366) yesterday which is what will be released to the general public on September 17th and it breaks compatibility with the Gear Fit2 Pro to the extent that it is not even detected as a Bluetooth device. All other Bluetooth devices are detected fine on iOS 12 and the Gear Fit2 itself is detected by other Bluetooth devices.

To top it all, there was no forewarning that this would happen as even the last iOS 12 Beta release worked fine with the Gear Fit2 Pro. Hence, it can only be construed that Apple made a change that hampers competing wearable devices, or at least this one from Samsung.

I have already shared the incompatibility details with Samsung and hope that they would release an update soon to address this issue since it seems Apple has already drawn the sword. Prospective owners should wait it out till the GF2 Pro becomes compatible with iOS 12.

P.S.: To follow-up on my previous post-script on Unicode 11.0, I have included the 'Star with left half black' as the fourth character in my star rating. You would be seeing a hollow block until your browser supports Unicode 11.0 which might not happen until the end of 2018 at the earliest, but that's the price you pay for writing in to the future.

Musing #53: Cluedo Champ!


Somehow, my childhood never crossed paths with Cluedo amongst the myriad of board games that helped shape it. Ironically, I watched the related movie several years back without having ever rolled the dice within Tudor mansion. I suppose the ignorance of those days, without access to mobiles and the Web, was a bliss in more ways than one. However, the competitive spirit was fostered by other familiar games as well as ones whose obscurity isn't lessened by scouring the Web.

It is never too late to start with something and hence I didn't bat an eyelid in getting the iOS version of Cluedo once I became aware of its existence earlier this week. I immediately felt like a duck in the water and soon found myself at the top of the leader board without much effort. Who knew that all those years of reading and watching whodunnits would make me such a great detective? Now, if only someone were to accept Cluedo as proof of my real-life logical reasoning skills.

For anyone looking to jump in to the app, I would recommend it with a few riders. The good part is that the digital representation is faithful to the physical one and is certainly captivating. On the flip side, the app has more than a few game breaking bugs, the biggest one being that the murder cards are repeated when there are not many players online and bots make up the numbers (looking at you, GreenToucan838). This can prop up the score if you so wish and I encountered it at least half a dozen times; but such instances are frustrating and I wish the developers had done a better job of it.

While I enjoyed partaking in Cluedo with people around the world, I felt it best to leave at the top. I suppose the screenshot below will immortalise my tryst with Cluedo, even though I am sure that the more persistent players would have beaten it by now. Yeah, that's Scarlett you see as me. I hope that a lot of players harrowed by my existence would now breathe a sigh of relief. Just may be, I have a come back in me somewhere down the line.


Tutorial #19: Optimally managing photos and videos on iOS


Apple’s anaemic storage options (specifically at the lowest tier) have been a running joke for a majority of the iPhone’s existence. I was at the receiving end of Apple’s largesse with the entry-level iPhone 7 switching to 32 GB which was further enhanced to 64 GB with the iPhone 8. Even with these storage options, one can easily fill it up with content other than captured photos and videos. Also, it is not a sound idea to have all your files stored locally on the device, irrespective of its storage capacity.

Apple provides a few options to mitigate the storage issues resulting from ever larger multimedia content. These are as follows:

1. The default option that most may take recourse to is the iCloud Photo Library. However, Apple provides a meagre 5 GB of storage for starters and as is typical of the company, you are expected to pay more to use this option practically. It only makes sense to go with Apple’s cloud if you live on it through other devices in the Apple ecosystem, like the Mac or iPad. The more important thing to note here is that by default Apple syncs your local photo library with the iCloud one, so you can end up permanently deleting your photos from the device as well as the cloud if you are not paying attention.

2. With the release of iOS 11, Apple introduced the high-efficiency formats, HEVC for videos and HEIF for images, that significantly reduce the file size on modern iDevices. The down side to this is that compatibility for this format is still not standard across platforms and devices. Most notably, the HEIF format is not yet natively supported by Windows. Even within Apple’s ecosystem, sharing the images or videos with older devices necessitates a conversion which takes up time as well as processing power on the mobile device.

3. Lastly, iOS also provides an ‘Optimize Storage’ option that keeps a lower quality version of the image on the phone for immediate viewing purpose while retrieving the full quality image from iCloud. This helps in dealing with storage issues but yet again results in the usage of additional time and data.

Luckily for iOS users, there are several third-party options available that allow one to back-up and retrieve photos and videos without having to pay or worry about running out of storage. After using quite a few options, I have shortlisted two well-known ones that together offer an unbeatable 1-2 combination. They are Flickr and Google Photos.

Before starting out, I would recommend that you go to Camera > Formats and select the ‘Most Compatible’ option which uses JPEG/H.264 instead of HEIF/HEVC. This ensures that the images are available for use without any conversion and accessible on all platforms. It will, of course, take up additional space but since we are offloading most of the stuff on to the cloud anyway, storage isn’t a constraint. On the other hand, data usage can be a constraint if you are limited to a cellular network, but the solution here ensures that even that eventuality is covered. As for the ‘Optimize Storage’ option, you can leave it enabled as iOS always provides the full quality image to any other app that requests it.

Our primary solution to the image storage problem is Flickr. One can argue that Flickr has seen better days and the Yahoo hacks might have left a few people dishevelled. Many photographers might have a preference for 500px as well, but that doesn’t take anything away from Flickr as far as our use case is concerned. Assuming that Oath (Verizon) wouldn’t bring about any drastic storage policy changes, Flickr offers the best value proposition for free users. The 1000 GB of storage space is unprecedented and the photography focus of the site is much better for image/photo management compared to a paid, storage-only option like OneDrive.

While Flickr has moved some of its tools like the desktop ‘Uploadr’ under the Pro banner, the iOS app is unaffected. It is capable of syncing with the iOS Photo Library and more importantly, uploading the original image to the cloud. It does not however support the HEIF format as is evident when you try to upload these images over the website. On iOS however, the images in the Photo Library are still uploaded after conversion to JPEG. Hence, I have previously recommended the usage of the ‘Most Compatible’ option to prevent unnecessary conversions. Unfortunately, Flickr doesn’t allow the segregation between photos and videos when uploading over a cellular connection and hence I would recommend syncing only over WiFi, unless you have an uncapped cellular connection.

The sidekick to our protagonist Flickr is Google Photos. On its own, Google Photos is an awesome product. However, ‘original quality’ images and videos are limited to the storage available on Google Drive for non-Pixel users, which in most cases is 15 GB. Luckily, Google offers an unlimited ‘High Quality’ option, which one should note, significantly compresses the image. However, thanks to clever use of algorithms and machine learning, the effects are not visible on most devices unless the image is blown up significantly.

As a secondary backup solution, Google Photos offers some distinct advantages. Firstly, it caches lower quality variants of all the images so that the entire library is accessible even when you are offline. Secondly, it offers smaller-sized files on account of the compression and resolution limitations of 16 MP/1080p, which is useful when accessing or sharing something over a cellular connection on social media. Thirdly, it allows photos and videos to be synced separately over WiFi and cellular connections, so that images can be synced immediately while larger videos can be uploaded later over WiFi. Fourthly, once images are backed up, they can be easily deleted from the device (and iCloud) using the ‘Free up space’ option. However, for this, you should ensure that the original images are first uploaded to Flickr. Lastly, the machine-learning powered search is really useful in unearthing hidden images and recreating past memories.

Thus, the combination of Flickr and Google Photos ensures that you have all your images and videos backed up regularly with redundancy and available on demand. While Flickr provides the long-term, original quality storage; Google Photos complements it with smaller-sized, optimized content for on-the-go consumption. It completely cuts off iCloud from the picture and ensures that you more storage available on your device for things that you need and use far more regularly.