Review #52: Tale of three (make that five) 3-in-1 cables


Cables are like humans, more than one can imagine. Looks can be deceiving and it is what's inside that matters. However, one can only perceive what one can see and hence the truth lies largely concealed. Thankfully, that is where the similarities end since marketing buzzwords like "gold plated", "tinned copper", "braided nylon" wouldn't really work well as complements for humans.

My tryst for the holy grail of cables started some time back when I started off with the Flome 3-in-1 cable, which, for the record, left me thoroughly disappointed. I have resigned myself to the fact that as long as reputable brands don't get in to the game, the possibility of expecting the ultimate phone charging cable to come from no-name brands in China is as large as catching the unicorn at the end of the rainbow. However, that hasn't deterred me from trying.

Since my last look at charging cables, I have added a couple more 3-in-1 cables, one from Baseus and another from "Fake Mi". The Baseus brand has proliferated quite a bit and I had my first go at it when I purchased a tempered glass for my iPhone. As it turned out, the mention of glass for the product was an euphemism but even then, the brand gets full marks for design and half for deception. I had a good experience with Mi's 2-in-1 cable which I had received with the Mi Power Bank Pro and although there is no mention of a 3-in-1 cable on Mi China's website, I went along for the ride by placing an order for the "Fake Mi" 3-in-1 cable. In this case, it was better to judge the cable by its cover since the package was branded as "Zaofeng" but the product could easily pass off  as an official Mi one.

Along with these three "the last cable you will ever need" cables, I have roped in two "not so in name but in function" pseudo 3-in-1 cables in the form of the Mi 2-in-1 and the EasyAcc Micro USB cable. In case you are confused, then don't be, as technically any Micro USB cable can be used as a Lightning or Type-C cable with the help of adapters. Sure, you don't get the official certifications, but it can get the job done as far as charging is concerned. In this case, the adapters came from the cannibalisation of other cables. After all, all's fair in love, war and charging.

Here's the fate of the contenders after being put through the trial with an Anker PowerPort 4 charger.


It is easy to draw some quick observations/conclusions from the above.

  • As expected, none of the 3-in-1 cables are up to much good, though the Baseus one seems to be the best of the lot. The finest option yet, as far as charging goes, is to get a good quality Micro USB cable and then use adapters to switch between devices.
  • The adapter quality can affect charging as can be seen by the performance difference of the Lightning one between Flome and Zaofeng. They are available for a few cents and can be jerry-rigged to function like a 3-in-1, though I presume at some point someone will release adapters with clasps. Cannibalisation from existing cables is always an option.
  • It is not a co-incidence that the shorter cables are usually the best. You should get a cable that is only as long as you need it to be. As I had mentioned previously, the longer they are, the easier they fail.
  • While not visible in the table above, the iPhone current draw was markedly different from the Mi devices. While the Mi devices charged flat out at the same current level irrespective of usage, the iPhone switched between 0.9-1.7A  depending on how the device was being utilised. I could draw the maximum current only by recording in 4K. This indicates that the iPhone maintains a preset charging rate for the battery while utilising additional current draw from the charger for on-screen activity. I guess these benefits come through the utilisation of much more expensive power management ICs.

Musing #50: Apple Music, Spotify and Amazon Music


Amazon launched its Music service in India earlier this week, so I thought I'd do a quick comparison of it with the other streaming services I have been using, Apple Music and Spotify. Before any one brings it up, I have trialled all the other music streaming services available locally in India (Gaana, Wynk, Saavn, Hungama) at one point or another and found them to disappointing in terms of quality and catalogue. Even Google Music didn't offer much to dislodge Apple when it launched in India, though it hit the mark with its pricing.

I didn't term this article as a review, since it isn't one. Since majority of my listening is done on the iPhone, now with my RHA MA650, Apple Music happens to be my preferred option. It offers the best integration with iOS (e.g. Siri) and has the best quality when streaming over Bluetooth. Spotify complements Apple Music really well with its cross-platform compatibility, track discovery and catalogue. On the other hand, I wouldn't really pay for Amazon Music if it existed as a separate subscription service but as yet another Prime membership perk, it is totally worth it.

I have briefly covered the features of each service in the table below along with the availability of various tracks at the time of writing this article. It should give a good idea of what each platform has to offer.


Review #50: RHA MA650 Wireless Earphones ★★★★☆

When wireless doesn't mean getting less! 


Bluetooth headsets have always been a matter of convenience for me rather than a technological evolution over wired headsets. For a long time, I preferred to use wired headsets whenever possible and took recourse to Bluetooth headsets when on the move. However, the abysmal performance of Bluetooth plug-in headsets like SBH54 and the Fiio BTR1 left me extremely disappointed and finally set me on course to finding a standalone wireless earphone.

Tutorial #19: Optimally managing photos and videos on iOS


Apple’s anaemic storage options (specifically at the lowest tier) have been a running joke for a majority of the iPhone’s existence. I was at the receiving end of Apple’s largesse with the entry-level iPhone 7 switching to 32 GB which was further enhanced to 64 GB with the iPhone 8. Even with these storage options, one can easily fill it up with content other than captured photos and videos. Also, it is not a sound idea to have all your files stored locally on the device, irrespective of its storage capacity.

Apple provides a few options to mitigate the storage issues resulting from ever larger multimedia content. These are as follows:

1. The default option that most may take recourse to is the iCloud Photo Library. However, Apple provides a meagre 5 GB of storage for starters and as is typical of the company, you are expected to pay more to use this option practically. It only makes sense to go with Apple’s cloud if you live on it through other devices in the Apple ecosystem, like the Mac or iPad. The more important thing to note here is that by default Apple syncs your local photo library with the iCloud one, so you can end up permanently deleting your photos from the device as well as the cloud if you are not paying attention.

2. With the release of iOS 11, Apple introduced the high-efficiency formats, HEVC for videos and HEIF for images, that significantly reduce the file size on modern iDevices. The down side to this is that compatibility for this format is still not standard across platforms and devices. Most notably, the HEIF format is not yet natively supported by Windows. Even within Apple’s ecosystem, sharing the images or videos with older devices necessitates a conversion which takes up time as well as processing power on the mobile device.

3. Lastly, iOS also provides an ‘Optimize Storage’ option that keeps a lower quality version of the image on the phone for immediate viewing purpose while retrieving the full quality image from iCloud. This helps in dealing with storage issues but yet again results in the usage of additional time and data.

Luckily for iOS users, there are several third-party options available that allow one to back-up and retrieve photos and videos without having to pay or worry about running out of storage. After using quite a few options, I have shortlisted two well-known ones that together offer an unbeatable 1-2 combination. They are Flickr and Google Photos.

Before starting out, I would recommend that you go to Camera > Formats and select the ‘Most Compatible’ option which uses JPEG/H.264 instead of HEIF/HEVC. This ensures that the images are available for use without any conversion and accessible on all platforms. It will, of course, take up additional space but since we are offloading most of the stuff on to the cloud anyway, storage isn’t a constraint. On the other hand, data usage can be a constraint if you are limited to a cellular network, but the solution here ensures that even that eventuality is covered. As for the ‘Optimize Storage’ option, you can leave it enabled as iOS always provides the full quality image to any other app that requests it.

Our primary solution to the image storage problem is Flickr. One can argue that Flickr has seen better days and the Yahoo hacks might have left a few people dishevelled. Many photographers might have a preference for 500px as well, but that doesn’t take anything away from Flickr as far as our use case is concerned. Assuming that Oath (Verizon) wouldn’t bring about any drastic storage policy changes, Flickr offers the best value proposition for free users. The 1000 GB of storage space is unprecedented and the photography focus of the site is much better for image/photo management compared to a paid, storage-only option like OneDrive.

While Flickr has moved some of its tools like the desktop ‘Uploadr’ under the Pro banner, the iOS app is unaffected. It is capable of syncing with the iOS Photo Library and more importantly, uploading the original image to the cloud. It does not however support the HEIF format as is evident when you try to upload these images over the website. On iOS however, the images in the Photo Library are still uploaded after conversion to JPEG. Hence, I have previously recommended the usage of the ‘Most Compatible’ option to prevent unnecessary conversions. Unfortunately, Flickr doesn’t allow the segregation between photos and videos when uploading over a cellular connection and hence I would recommend syncing only over WiFi, unless you have an uncapped cellular connection.

The sidekick to our protagonist Flickr is Google Photos. On its own, Google Photos is an awesome product. However, ‘original quality’ images and videos are limited to the storage available on Google Drive for non-Pixel users, which in most cases is 15 GB. Luckily, Google offers an unlimited ‘High Quality’ option, which one should note, significantly compresses the image. However, thanks to clever use of algorithms and machine learning, the effects are not visible on most devices unless the image is blown up significantly.

As a secondary backup solution, Google Photos offers some distinct advantages. Firstly, it caches lower quality variants of all the images so that the entire library is accessible even when you are offline. Secondly, it offers smaller-sized files on account of the compression and resolution limitations of 16 MP/1080p, which is useful when accessing or sharing something over a cellular connection on social media. Thirdly, it allows photos and videos to be synced separately over WiFi and cellular connections, so that images can be synced immediately while larger videos can be uploaded later over WiFi. Fourthly, once images are backed up, they can be easily deleted from the device (and iCloud) using the ‘Free up space’ option. However, for this, you should ensure that the original images are first uploaded to Flickr. Lastly, the machine-learning powered search is really useful in unearthing hidden images and recreating past memories.

Thus, the combination of Flickr and Google Photos ensures that you have all your images and videos backed up regularly with redundancy and available on demand. While Flickr provides the long-term, original quality storage; Google Photos complements it with smaller-sized, optimized content for on-the-go consumption. It completely cuts off iCloud from the picture and ensures that you more storage available on your device for things that you need and use far more regularly.

Review #45: Mi A1 (Updated with Oreo impressions) ★★★★☆

An A1 Choice


The Android One programme was launched in 2014 with the intention of being the entry point for budget conscious users. Perhaps it was the choice of hardware or OEMs that ultimately made it a stillborn venture. On the other end of the spectrum, the Pixel hasn't quite turned out to be the iPhone killer that Google might have envisaged. However, Google isn't one to take things lying down and hence we now have the reinvigorated Android One programme. This time Google has taken a much more hands-off approach, with this being no more than a branding exercise and the entire onus of the device specification as well as updates following squarely on the shoulders of the OEM.

For an OEM like Xiaomi that is well entrenched in MIUI, it certainly came as a surprise when it was mentioned as the first partner of the new avatar of Android One. At the same time, it seemed a logical choice considering the stranglehold that various Mi devices now have at the budget segment of the market. I had already "upgraded" the Redmi Note 3 of one of my family members to LineageOS to make the device more usable and while getting another Mi device, it was a toss-up between getting a Redmi Note 4 and flashing it with LineageOS or getting the Mi A1 with stock android on board. Ultimately, the novelty of the dual camera setup as well as a manufacturer supported implementation of stock Android justified the premium.

While the review is focussed on the Mi A1, I found it a good idea to compare it with the other phones I have at my disposal which is the Redmi Note 3 and the iPhone 7. The Note 3 should be a good comparison coming from the same stable but based on a year-old higher performance chipset while the iPhone 7 acts like a good benchmark.

Review #47: Walnutt Flexible Bumper Case (iPhone) ★★★☆☆



A bump in the road!
A bumper case is a sweet compromise between using the phone as manufactured and sheathing it in a figurative armour. The RhinoShield CrashGuard has done well in this space and while price is a genuine concern when purchasing it in India, it also has its fair share of issues with its width, buttons and removal. Far cry from that is the 'Walnutt' bumper case. Going by the different brands and prices this case is sold under, it seems to be a generic case, rather than one from a specific company.